Today’s Ponder HYMN IX Bk VII Atharva Veda

A prayer to Pūshan for protection and the recovery of lost property

1   Pūshan was born to move on distant pathways, on roads remote
from earth, remote from heaven.
To both most lovely places of assembly he travels and returns
with perfect knowledge.
2   Pūshan knows all these realms: may he conduct us by ways that
are most free from fear and danger.
Giver of blessings, glowing, all heroic, may he the wise and
watchful go before us.
3   We are thy praisers here, O Pūshan: never let us be injured  under thy protection.
4   From out the distance, far and wide, may Pūshan stretch his
right hand forth. Let him drive back our lost to us, let us return with what is lost.

Hymns of the Atharva Veda, by Ralph T.H. Griffith, [1895], at sacred-texts.com

Pushan is also known as Puchan and is a protector and multiplier of cattle and of human possessions in general. If you have ever lost anything that you valued you may have prayed for his help, or maybe you didn’t ask for his assistance but he helped you anyway, which is why he is a God.  IH

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Today’s Ponder Hymns of the Atharva Veda

HYMN XLV

                                                    Read in 30 seconds, Ponder forever

A prayer for preservation from mental sin and evil promptings

Sin of the Mind, avaunt! begone! Why sayest thou what none
should say?
Go hence away, I love thee not. Go to the forests and the trees.
My heart is in our homes and cows.
2   Whatever wrong we have committed, sleeping or waking, by
ill-wish, dislike, or slander,
All these offences, which deserve displeasure, may Agni take
from us and keep them distant.
3   Indra and Brāhmanaspati! whatever foolish deed we plan,
May provident Angirasa preserve us from the sin and woe.

Hymns of the Atharva Veda, by Ralph T.H. Griffith, [1895], at sacred-texts.com

Today’s Ponder

Swami Vivekananda went out into the world to spread Ramakrishna Paramahamsa’s message. In 1893, he was invited to the World Parliament of Religions, in Chicago. As a representative of Hinduism he gave several speeches to great acclaim within the Parliament and the world at large. He is credited with playing a big part in bringing an understanding of Hinduism to the Western mindset.

Points to Ponder

All differences in this world are of degree, and not of kind, because oneness is the secret of everything.

Who makes us ignorant? We ourselves. We put our hands over our eyes and weep that it is dark.

The world is the great gymnasium where we come to make ourselves strong.

Today’s Ponder

This week we are digesting words of wisdom  from Swami Vivekanada. Swami Vivekananda Bengali, Shāmi Bibekānondo; 12 January 1863 – 4 July 1902, born Narendranath Datta, was an Indian Hindu monk, a chief disciple of the 19th-century Indian mystic Ramakrishna. One of India’s most inspiring human beings. He wrote broadly about many topics regarding this human life.  Credited with reviving Indian nationalism and the Hindu way of life, with the guidance of his Guru, the mystic Ramakrishna Paramahamsa, his wisdom and encouragement have transcended time.

Points To Ponder

Comfort is no test of truth. Truth is often far from being comfortable.

The Land where humanity has attained its highest towards gentleness, towards generosity, towards purity, towards calmness – it is India.

All truth is eternal. Truth is nobody’s property; no race, no individual can lay any exclusive claim to it. Truth is the nature of all souls.

Today’s Ponder

This week lets look at some words of wisdom from Swami Vivekanada. Swami Vivekananda Bengali, Shāmi Bibekānondo; 12 January 1863 – 4 July 1902, born Narendranath Datta, was an Indian Hindu monk, a chief disciple of the 19th-century Indian mystic Ramakrishna. One of India’s most inspiring human beings. He wrote broadly about many topics regarding this human life.  Credited with reviving Indian nationalism and the Hindu way of life, with the guidance of his Guru, the mystic Ramakrishna Paramahamsa, his wisdom and encouragement have transcended time.

Today’s Ponder

Arise, awake, stop not until your goal is achieved.

Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life – think of it, dream of it, and live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success that is way great spiritual giants are produced.

All love is expansion, all selfishness is contraction. Love is therefore the only law of life. He who loves lives, he who is selfish is dying. Therefore love for love’s sake, because it is law of life, just as you breathe to live.

The great secret of true success, of true happiness, is this: the man or woman who asks for no return, the perfectly unselfish person, is the most successful.

The greatest religion is to be true to your own nature. Have faith in yourselves.

 

 

Minimize, Renounce, and Feel Good

” How quickly we tire of earthly pleasures. Desire for material things is endless; we are never satisfied .”

Recently, I have been studying a frequently misunderstood Dharma concept,  that of renouncement, (Sanskrit; Sannyasa).  It is not, as some seem to think, a mandate at any stage of life, although as people age it seems to come naturally. Actually, material renouncement is not exactly the same as sannyasa but it is the first step.   Most of us could use a bit of renouncement at any age, as was brought to my attention by my daughter as she explained to me after a rigorous “material cleansing” of what seemed to me to be most of her worldly goods.

“I am getting better”, she said, “slowly becoming more minimalist. It feels great to be content with what you have, and grateful!” 

Continue reading “Minimize, Renounce, and Feel Good”

Today’s Ponder

A minute to read a lifetime to practice. Material lust

The main cause for developing discontentment is temptation. Let us see how a beggar’s discontentment lead to his misfortune!

A beggar would chant God’s name all day. One day, God manifested before the beggar and asked him to name his wish. The beggar wished for gold coins. God asked him, “What will you collect them in ?” The beggar put forward his sack. Before pouring gold coins into the sack, God said, “I will give you gold coins till you say ‘enough’, but on one condition. The gold coins should not fall to the ground. If they do, they will turn into dust”. The beggar accepted the condition. Gold coins immediately started to rain into his sack. The sack began to fill up gradually, but the beggar could not control his avarice for gold. Now, with the weight of the coins, the sack began to burst at its seams. Despite realizing this, the beggar did not say ‘enough’. Finally, the inevitable happened; the sack tore open and all the coins fell to the ground and turned into dust ! The beggar’s discontentment lead to his downfall !

A timeless story from https://www.hindujagruti.org/hinduism-for-kids/594.html

I have my own problems with material attachments which thanks to Sanata Dharma I am working through.  Let’s all work through our material lust together. More later on this subject

 

From the Upanishads

A minute to read a lifetime to ponder

Finite and transient are the fruits of sacrificial rites. The deluded, who regard them as the highest good, remain subject to birth and death.

Living in the abyss of ignorance, yet wise in their own conceit, the deluded go round and round [on the wheel of death and rebirth], like the blind led by the blind.

Living in the abyss of ignorance, the deluded think themselves blessed. Attached to works, they know not God. Works lead them only to heaven, whence, to their sorrow, their rewards quickly exhausted, they are flung back to earth.

Considering religion to be observance of rituals and performance of acts of charity, the deluded remain ignorant of the highest good. Having enjoyed in heaven the reward of their good works, they enter again into the world of mortals.

But the wise, self-controlled, and tranquil souls, who are contented inspirit, and who practice austerity and meditation in solitude and silence, are freed from all impurity, and attain by the path of liberation the immortal, the truly existing, the changeless self.

http://www.wisdomlib.org/hinduism/book/mundaka-upanishad-shankara-bhashya/d/doc145091.html     http://www.wisdomlib.org/

 

Upanishad books

From The Upanishads

Brihadaranyaka Upanishad 4.4.6-7

We live in accordance with our deep, driving desire. It is this desire at
the time of death that determines what our next life is to be. We will
come back to earth to work out the satisfaction of that desire.

But not for those who are free from desire; they are free because all
their desires have found fulfillment in the Self. They do not die like
the others; but realizing Brahman, they merge in Brahman. So it is said:

When all the desires that surge in the heart
Are renounced, the mortal becomes immortal.

When all the knots that strangle the heart
Are loosened, the mortal becomes immortal,
Here in this very life.

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